-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-

By Carmen Anderson

Mojib Benhakim has always had an interest in helping people, and had wanted to find a career path which made him feel fulfilled and gave him a sense of achievement. He especially wanted to help the local community and have a positive impact on other people’s lives. 

It was at a time when Mojib was giving his future career some considerable thought that the RGP launched one of their recruitment campaigns. This caught his attention and he discovered that the RGP was looking for skills which he felt he could offer. He took the plunge, made the application and has been working with the RGP for the past 9 years.  

Arriving in Gibraltar as a boy of 13 years, born and raised in the north Moroccan port of Tetouan, Mojib could speak Moroccan and French, but no English. It was a challenge for him to be able to learn the language and it took him some time to come to grips with English. While spoken English came more easily, the written language was more difficult to master. This meant that educational achievements came a little bit later for Mojib than for most young people in Gibraltar. 

“It was a big sacrifice, and it wasn’t easy, but it was so worth it.”

At the age of 21, after a period of work, he returned to full time education at the Gibraltar College, gaining 9 GCSEs and 3 A levels; “It was only after the age of 21 when I realised that I could achieve a lot and that I had a lot of potential. I wanted to feel that I was doing something for the community and that is why I pushed myself to work for the RGP. It was a big sacrifice, and it wasn’t easy, but it was so worth it.” 

Mojib’s determination and skills led him to be accepted into the RGP as a recruit, entering the RGP training school; a tough challenge which included weekly exams. Nine years on and Mojib has worked in almost all aspects of policing, including the Neighbourhood Policing Team and the Marine Section, the latter of which is a particular favourite of his. 

While he enjoys all aspects of working with the RGP, he particularly appreciates the variety that comes with the job; “I love how every day is different. One day you could be arresting someone, the next you are working as more of a social worker, and the next, you’re a medic! You are literally doing everything, and I love it. I’ve worked with the RGP for almost 9 years and there has been no stone that I have left unturned. My skill set is varied and so I can be used in many different departments.” 

Mojib hopes to spend as much time working within the RGP as he can; “Not many people can say that they love their job, but I can say that when you do, then you know you’re going to stay in that job for the rest of your life.”

Mojib knows that there are people out there who have the same ambition of helping the community as he did, and some might be considering working with the RGP: “It is not an easy job,” he advises anybody considering a career in the police force, “it is something that demands a lot of you. There are many sacrifices that will be required of you and you face challenges that few other people will have to face. But, if you like the job, and you want to help people, the RGP is the best place to do it. If you have this sort of mentality, I would definitely recommend that you apply. You will love it.” 

-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-
-advertisement-